cognitive and situated learning perspectives in theory and practice pdf

Cognitive and situated learning perspectives in theory and practice pdf

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Cognitive and Situated Learning Perspectives in Theory and Practice

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Situated learning

Cognitive and Situated Learning Perspectives in Theory and Practice

Situated cognition is a theory that posits that knowing is inseparable from doing [1] by arguing that all knowledge is situated in activity bound to social, cultural and physical contexts. Under this assumption, which requires an epistemological shift from empiricism, situativity theorists suggest a model of knowledge and learning that requires thinking on the fly rather than the storage and retrieval of conceptual knowledge. In essence, cognition cannot be separated from the context. Instead knowing exists, in situ , inseparable from context, activity, people, culture, and language. Therefore, learning is seen in terms of an individual's increasingly effective performance across situations rather than in terms of an accumulation of knowledge, since what is known is co-determined by the agent and the context. This perspective rejects mind—body dualism , being conceptually similar to functional contextualism , and B. Skinner 's behavior analysis.

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To browse Academia. Skip to main content. By using our site, you agree to our collection of information through the use of cookies. To learn more, view our Privacy Policy. Log In Sign Up. Download Free PDF. Janet Bowers.

The Digital Revolution has introduced a radically different learner faced with a distinct set of requirements, a striking contrast to learners of previous times. Rather, it is essential that learners actively acquire relevant knowledge and skills by performing work in meaningful situated contexts. In this way, knowledge and skill sets acquired by learners can be used to solve problems. This chapter discusses the significance of situated learning on cognition applied in the context of technology-supported learning; a progressive pedagogical approach that bridges the generational gap between learning of content through formal instruction and real-life application of knowledge and skills to diverse environments. The world is constantly changing and so are the requirements for active participation within it.

Situated learning is a theory that explains an individual's acquisition of professional skills and includes research on apprenticeship into how legitimate peripheral participation leads to membership in a community of practice. The theory is distinguished from alternative views of learning which define learning as the acquisition of propositional knowledge. Situated learning was first proposed by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger as a model of learning in a community of practice. At its simplest, situated learning is learning that takes place in the same context in which it is applied. For example, the workplace is considered as a discernible community of practice operating as a context wherein newcomers assimilate norms, behavior, values, relationships, and beliefs. Lave and Wenger [5] argue that learning is a social process whereby knowledge is co-constructed; they suggest that such learning is situated in a specific context and embedded within a particular social and physical environment. Against the prevalent view of learning that involves the cognitive process in which individuals are respectively engaged in as learners, Lave and Wenger viewed learning as participation in the social world, suggesting learning as an integral and inseparable aspect of social practice.

Situated learning

This article or chapter is incomplete and its contents need further attention. Some information may be missing or may be wrong, spelling and grammar may have to be improved, use your judgment! Situated learning like socio-constructivism refers either to families of learning theories or pedagogic strategies. It is closely related to socio-culturalism and distributed cognition and probably identical to cognitive apprenticeship. For Brown, Collins and Duguid knowledge is a set of tools that need a context in order to be used and made explicit.

SLT is distinctive because it perceives learning to be a socially relational rather than a mentalist process. SLT places research attention upon knowledge production in situ and in the course of work practices rather than upon learning transmission in the classroom. This paper argues that SLT's emphasis on the social context of learning is problematic and ambiguous. SLT sees context as pregiven, which is consistent with modernist thought, but also sees it as emergent, which is more consistent with postmodern thought.

3 comments

  • Glauc S. 02.05.2021 at 20:07

    Situated learning theory commends a conceptualization of the process of learning that, in offering an alternative to cognitive theories, departs radically from the received body of knowledge on learning in organizations.

    Reply
  • Mandel L. 05.05.2021 at 06:04

    Teacher learning in second language teacher education: a socially-situated perspective.

    Reply
  • Lucas K. 05.05.2021 at 14:03

    An economic history of the ussr pdf pak urdu mcqs pdf with answers

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