oneness and trinity by david k bernard pdf

Oneness and trinity by david k bernard pdf

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A History of Christian Doctrine, By David K. Bernard

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A History of Christian Doctrine, By David K. Bernard

Bernard Hazelwood, MO All Scripture quotations in this book are from the King James Version of the Bible unless otherwise identified.

All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, stored in an electronic system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of David K. Brief quotations may be used in literary reviews. Includes bibliographical references and index. Contents: v. ISBN pbk. Theology, Doctrinal—History.

Church history. Oneness doctrine Pentecostalism —History. BT B '. The Study of Doctrine in Church History. Early Post-Apostolic Writers, A.

Early Heresies. The Greek Apologists, A. The Old Catholic Age, A. The Ecumenical Catholic Age, A. The Canon of Scripture. The Doctrine of God. The Doctrine of Christ. The Doctrines of Humanity and Salvation. The Doctrine and Structure of the Church. The Early Sacraments. Pagan Influences.

The Early Middle Ages, A. The Later Middle Ages, A. The Medieval Doctrinal System. The Road to the Reformation. Dates in the History of Christianity. Oneness Believers in History. Ancient Creeds. Speaking in Tongues in History. Holiness Teaching in History.

Development of Roman Catholicism. Preface This book surveys the history of Christian doctrine from approximately A. It generally follows chronological order and identifies the most significant events in church history, but the emphasis is on tracing doctrinal developments. To further this purpose, it discusses some events thematically rather than in strict chronological sequence. We will use the words church and Christian in the most general sense, recognizing that the visible church structure is not necessarily the New Testament church as defined by message and experience.

We will discuss the major groups of people who have identified themselves as Christian. Occasionally material in this book may seem complex and foreign, but some treatment of details is necessary to provide background and to impart a feel for significant issues and problems. The main objective is to introduce the leading historical figures and movements in Christendom and to convey a basic understanding of their doctrines.

This information will provide various perspectives on biblical issues and will aid in dialogue with people of different backgrounds. The reader will see when, how, and why certain biblical doctrines were abandoned and certain unbiblical doctrines embraced, and will see how God has worked to restore and revive fundamental truths that were largely forgotten. The rough draft was transcribed from lectures taped for the extension program of Kent Christian College in Dover, Delaware.

It was an immense project! After considerable additions, deletions, and revisions, this book is the result. It is important to remember that only the Bible is our authority for doctrine.

History cannot alter or replace biblical truth. Nor can history prove the validity of doctrine, but it can provide insight into how key doctrines were handled over the centuries. It can help to dispel the myth that our fundamental doctrines are of recent origin. The clear teaching of Scripture is enough to tear away the shrouds of nonbiblical tradition, but a historical survey can aid in the process. We can identify several reasons.

A second purpose is to trace the development of false doctrines. If we conclude that some doctrines taught in Christendom today are erroneous, the question arises, Where did these false doctrines begin? Church history can help show us which doctrines were original, which were not, how false doctrines entered Christendom, and how they became, in some cases, part of the mainstream of historic Christendom. A third benefit of this study is learning about the 1 The Study of Doctrine in Church History 9 major denominations and movements, thereby providing a context for dialogue today.

The goal is to identify each major category of Christendom and learn where it began, why it began, and what its distinctive, characteristic doctrines are.

Scope of Study At the outset, let us define the boundaries of our study. We will start with the death of the apostles, or the. By using the words church and Christianity, we will not make a value judgment as to the accuracy of the doctrines of various groups. Rather, we will use the words church, Christian, and Christendom in the most general sense, speaking of the visible structures known collectively as Christianity.

When we speak of Christian doctrines we do not mean that a particular belief is correct or has been officially endorsed, only that some people within Christendom have believed and taught it. We would expect to find true apostolic believers within the visible, historical church, or at least associated in some way with it at various times, but the visible church is not always identical to the invisible church, the true church, the church of God.

We will focus on all those who have historically gone by the label of Christian, whether or not their experience and doctrine seem identical to that of the apostles in the first century. Our study will be an overview, not an exhaustive investigation. We will not describe in great detail all the movements, personalities, and events in church history, but we will seek to give at least a survey of church histo- 10 A History of Christian Doctrine ry, particularly focusing on doctrinal history.

We will not place heavy emphasis on names, places, and dates, but we will look primarily at the origins of various doctrines and movements throughout the history of Christianity. A great falling away. It is evident when we study early church history that there was a great falling away, a great infusion of false doctrine.

Indeed we find warnings and indications of this falling away in the New Testament itself. It contains admonitions to the early church not to embrace false doctrine as well as warnings concerning false prophets, false teachers, and false doctrines that were already creeping in among the churches.

It also predicts that in the latter days would come a great falling away, seducing spirits, and doctrines of demons. Even in the first-century church, then, problems had.

In Revelation 2 and 3, letters to seven churches in Asia Minor reveal serious errors of doctrine and practice in various local assemblies in the first century. In the second century, this process of doctrinal corruption accelerated. In short, we find a great influx of false doctrines over the centuries. A faithful remnant. At least a few people in church history continued to hold onto the apostolic doctrine and the apostolic experience.

See Romans He has always had a church. The apostolic church as defined by the experience and message of the Scriptures has never entirely faded away. This belief does not mean that as a matter of history we can necessarily identify a fully apostolic group known by a particular name at every decade throughout the hundreds of years of church history.

It does not mean we can trace an unbroken historical succession of an organization or series of organizations. It does not mean that at every point in time a group of people taught every doctrine we believe to be biblical. At some times, great numbers of people adhered to the apostolic faith; at other times, perhaps just a handful did so. For certain decades we may not have a historical record of anybody who was identical to the apostles in experience and teaching.

But as a matter of faith, even when there may be historical gaps, we can affirm that 12 A History of Christian Doctrine God had a people born of water and the Spirit, believers. A circular pattern. We can discern a trend of events in church history, and we can represent it by a circle. The church began with great evangelistic growth, with a great burst of power and fervor as recorded in the Book of Acts.

Then came a gradual falling away into false doctrine, and as this falling away intensified, for the most part the visible church fell into apostasy, having little or no real experience with God. This apostasy was not permanent, at least not in a historical sense. Over the centuries, particularly after the medieval period, we find a step-by-step restoration of various doctrines, beliefs, and experiences, returning closer to the original apostolic pattern. The apostolic message has always been the same; the true church of God has always been defined in the same way.

In that sense the church never needs to be restored. If there were people in a certain century who were filled with the Spirit, then they did not need restoration to that experience. When we speak about restoration, we mean a renewed understanding of certain doctrines and a widespread acceptance of certain works of God.

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Bernard Hazelwood, MO All Scripture quotations in this book are from the King James Version of the Bible unless otherwise identified. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, stored in an electronic system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of David K. Brief quotations may be used in literary reviews. Includes bibliographical references and index.

All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, stored in an electronic system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of Word Aflame Press. Brief quotations may be used in literary reviews. Although this copy is available on the Internet, this does not affect or reduce the copyright protection of this work. Any errors in this scanned version of this book are not the responsibility of David K. This electronic book was enhanced to support hyperlinks for footnotes, references and more.

Published by London Thought Society. Written in English. Oneness Pentecostal theology affirms that there exists only one God in all the universe. It affirms the deity of Jesus and the Holy Spirit. However, Oneness theology denies the Trinity.


oneness and trinity a d the doctrine of god in, oneness perspectives on the incarnation, a definitive look at oneness theology.


How to buy a book?

Health Details: treatment of the oneness of God in this book is designed to be simple; but the truths are profound, scholarly, priceless, and essential to the people of God and a lost world. A book must meet at least two main criteria to be a best-seller. It must be written interestingly and must fill a need. The author accomplishes both.

Calvin Beisner I. Historical Background A. Offshoot of American Pentecostal movement of early s B. Prompted in by adoption of a Jesus name baptismal formula C. Opposed by Assemblies of God main Pentecostal denomination in and D.

 - Он жестом попросил ее возобновить поиск.  - Но пока этого не произошло, мы в цейтноте. Сьюзан открыла рот, желая сказать, что она все понимает, но ее слова были заглушены внезапным пронзительным звуком. Тишина шифровалки взорвалась сигналом тревоги, доносившимся из служебного помещения ТРАНСТЕКСТА. Сьюзан и Стратмор в недоумении посмотрели друг на друга.

1 comments

  • Leone P. 24.04.2021 at 12:34

    Oneness and trinity, A.D. the doctrine of God in ancient. Christian writings/by David K. Bernard. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index.

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