comparative and superlative exercises less least pdf

Comparative and superlative exercises less least pdf

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Comparative and superlative adjectives – article

What is a comparative adjective?

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Comparative with Less

Comparative and superlative adjectives – article

An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield covering ways to approach teaching comparatives and superlatives. One way of describing a person or thing is by saying that they have more of a particular quality than someone or something else. It is also possible to describe someone or something by saying that they have more of a particular quality than any other of their kind. We do this by using superlative adjectives, which are formed by adding -est at the end of the adjective and placing the before it, or placing the most before the adjective, e.

One syllable adjectives generally form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est , e. Here are three examples. The comparative of ill is worse , and the comparative of well is better , e.

The usual comparative and superlative forms of the adjective old are older and oldest. However, the alternative forms elder and eldest are sometimes used. Elder and eldest are generally restricted to talking about the age of people, especially people within the same family, and are not used to talk about the age of things, e.

Elder cannot occur in the predicative position after link verbs such as be , become , get , e. Comparatives and superlatives of compound adjectives are generally formed by using more and most , e. Common examples of adjectives like these are: complete , equal , favourite , and perfect.

Just like other adjectives, comparatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, e. Comparatives are very commonly followed by than and a pronoun or noun group, in order to describe who the other person or thing involved in the comparison is, e.

Two comparatives can be contrasted by placing the before them, indicating that a change in one quality is linked to a change in another, e. Two comparatives can also be linked with and to show a continuing increase in a particular quality, e.

Like comparatives, superlatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, or occur after be and other link verbs, e. As shown in the second two examples, superlatives are often used on their own if it is clear what or who is being compared.

If you want to be specific about what you are comparing, you can do this with a noun, or a phrase beginning with in or of, e. Another way of being specific is by placing a relative clause after the superlative, e. Note that if the superlative occurs before the noun, in the attributive position, the in or of phrase or relative clause comes after the noun, eg.

Although the usually occurs before a superlative, it is sometimes left out in informal speech or writing, e. Sometimes possessive pronouns are used instead of the before a superlative, e. Ordinal numbers are often used with superlatives to indicate that something has more of a particular quality than most others of its kind, e.

In informal conversation, superlatives are often used instead of comparatives when comparing two things. For example, when comparing a train journey and car journey to Edinburgh, someone might say: the train is quickest , rather than: the train is quicker. Superlatives are not generally used in this way in formal speech and writing. If we want to talk about a quality which is smaller in amount relative to others, we use the forms less the opposite of comparative more , and the least the opposite of superlative the most.

Less is used to indicate that something or someone does not have as much of a particular quality as someone or something else, e. The least is used to indicate that something or someone has less of a quality than any other person or thing of its kind, e. An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on ways to approach teaching the present perfect aspect. Articles, tips and activities covering everything you need to know about verbs and tenses, including reported speech, passives and modals.

Our experts provide a compendium of tips and ideas for teaching nouns, prepositions and relative clauses in English. With more than , registered users in over countries around the world, Onestopenglish is the number one resource site for English language teachers, providing access to thousands of resources, including lesson plans, worksheets, audio, video and flashcards. Company number: VAT number: Site powered by Webvision Cloud. Skip to main content Skip to navigation.

Support for teaching grammar. No comments. Source: SerjioLe, iStockphoto. The street has become quieter since they left. You should be more sensible. John is taller than me. The more stressed you are, the worse it is for your health. Her illness was becoming worse and worse. He became more and more tired as the weeks went by.

This one is the cheapest of the new designs. The cathedral is the second most popular tourist attraction. She was the least intelligent of the three sisters. Adjectives 1 Adjectives. Adjectives and noun modifiers in English — article. Adjectives and noun modifiers in English — tips and activities. Currently reading Comparative and superlative adjectives — article. Comparative and superlative adjectives — tips and activities.

Related articles. Article Reported speech — tips and activities Tips and ideas from Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on teaching reported speech. Article Reported speech 2 — article An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on approaches to teaching reported speech. Article Present perfect aspect — article An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on ways to approach teaching the present perfect aspect.

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Article Nouns and phrases Our experts provide a compendium of tips and ideas for teaching nouns, prepositions and relative clauses in English. Article Adjectives Articles, tips and activities on teaching adjectives, from our panel of expert authors. Join onestopenglish today With more than , registered users in over countries around the world, Onestopenglish is the number one resource site for English language teachers, providing access to thousands of resources, including lesson plans, worksheets, audio, video and flashcards.

What is a comparative adjective?

Jump to navigation. Adjectives are used to describe, identify, modify or quantify nouns or pronouns. Adjectives have three degrees that compare one thing to another. The three degrees of adjectives are positive, comparative and superlative. The comparative and superlative degrees are used to compare between two or more subjects or objects. In this sentence, the comparative degree smarter of the adjective 'smart' is used to compare between the two persons.

Follow edited Nov 18 '12 at The comparative and superlative degrees are formed by adding the -er and -est suffix to adjectives and adverbs with a single consonant for an ending. Comparative adjectives are used to compare 2 things and superlative adjectives are used to compare 3 or more things. How do we use comparative degree in comparing two objects. Comparative degree of an adjective denotes a higher degree when compared to a positive degree.


Write the comparative and superlative forms of the adjectives below. #. Adjective. Comparative far. 12 badly. 13 fluently. Exercise 6. COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES OF ADVERBS. Write the Use adverbs for at least one of the sets.


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Comparatives are used when expressing terms like more than or less than. Comparative adjectives. What is a comparative adjective?

Comparative Form The descriptive form is used to describe one noun or pronoun. Change the adjective to a comparative or a superlative form. There are less people here than promised to come. Fill in the gaps with the comparative form of the adjectives given.

Comparative with Less

Feb 23, - Comparatives and superlatives online activity for Elementary. Comparatives Chart 1 - Each of the following adjectives has a comparative and a superlative form. Comparative exercises. Please log in to save your progress. Simple Addition Subtraction Word Problems. My students liked it very much. Comparatives - Long vs Short Forms

Jump to navigation. We compare, contrast, and rank things in everyday life whether we are talking about our favorite things, shopping, or analyzing academic material. A solid understanding of comparative and superlative adjectives will help EFL learners perform tasks involving these critical thinking skills while using English.

A comparative adjective is used to compare two nouns denoting a higher or lower degree of quality with respect to one another. For example, Aharsi is stronger than Advik.

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  • Hamilton C. 28.04.2021 at 18:00

    Comparisons with. (Not) As As and Less. Lesson 3 page Superlative. Adjectives and 3 DISCOVER. Complete the exercises to learn about the grammar in this lesson. What word follows comparisons beginning with less + adverb?

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